Don’t Believe the American Heart Association — Butter, Steak and Coconut Oil Aren’t Likely to Kill You

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Investigative journalist Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet, pens an op-ed in today’s Los Angeles Times:

Last month, the American Heart Assn. once again went after butter, steak and especially coconut oil with this familiar warning: The saturated fats in these foods cause heart disease. The organization’s “presidential advisory” was a fresh look at the science and came in response to a growing number of researchers, including myself, who have poured over this same data in recent years and beg to differ. A rigorous review of the evidence shows that when it comes to heart attacks or mortality, saturated fats are not guilty.

To me, the AHA advisory released in June was mystifying. How could its scientists examine the same studies as I had, yet double down on an anti-saturated fat position? With a cardiologist, I went through the nuts and bolts of the AHA paper, and came to this conclusion: It was likely driven less by sound science than by longstanding bias, commercial interests and the AHA’s need to reaffirm nearly 70 years of its “heart healthy” advice.

 

Plus this:

The diet-heart hypothesis has been tested more than any other in the history of nutrition, and thus far, the results have been null.

Read the whole thing.

 

Further Reading:  “Don’t Believe the American Heart Association — Butter, Steak and Coconut Oil Aren’t Likely to Kill You” – The Los Angeles Times

 

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